7 DIY Paracord Knots for Survival Skills

7 DIY Paracord Knots for Survival Skills

7 DIY Paracord Knots to Practice

Paracord, also known as parachute cord, is a versatile and durable nylon rope that is commonly used in survival situations. This cord has a wide range of uses, from building shelters to making traps, repairing gear, creating tools, and even fashion accessories. One of the reasons paracord is so popular among survivalists is its strength and the different types of knots you can create with it.

In this post, we will explore seven DIY paracord knots that you can practice to enhance your survival skills. These knots are not only practical but also fun to learn and use in various situations. So grab your paracord and let’s get started!

1. Cobra Knot

The cobra knot is one of the most basic and popular paracord knots. It creates a thick, decorative braid that can be used as a handle or strap for tools, bags, or even bracelets. Here’s how to tie a cobra knot:

1. Start by folding the paracord in half to create a loop.
2. Pass the folded end of the cord through a keyring or any loop you want to attach the knot to.
3. Take the left side of the cord and place it over the loop.
4. Take the right side of the cord and place it over the left side and through the loop.
5. Tighten the knot by pulling both ends of the cord.
6. Repeat steps 3 to 5 until you reach the desired length.

2. Square Knot

The square knot, also known as the reef knot, is a simple yet practical knot that can be used for joining two pieces of paracord or other types of rope. It’s essential to learn this knot as it has many practical applications in survival and everyday situations. Here’s how to tie a square knot:

1. Cross the left side of the cord over the right side.
2. Bring the left side under the right side and through the loop.
3. Cross the right side of the cord over the left side.
4. Bring the right side under the left side and through the loop.
5. Tighten the knot by pulling both ends of the cord.

3. Trilene Knot

The trilene knot is commonly used in fishing to attach the fishing line to a hook or lure. However, it can also be useful in survival situations, such as creating fishing nets or repairing gear. Here’s how to tie a trilene knot:

1. Double the paracord and pass the loop through the eye of the hook.
2. Take the loop and make five turns around the standing line.
3. Pass the end of the loop through the first loop formed above the eye of the hook.
4. Moisten the knot and slowly tighten it by pulling both ends of the cord.
5. Trim any excess cord.

4. Figure Eight Knot

The figure eight knot, also known as the stopper knot, is an excellent knot for preventing ropes or cords from slipping through holes or loops. It’s straightforward to tie and can be used as a stopper knot for various camping and survival purposes. Here’s how to tie a figure eight knot:

1. Form a loop with the paracord.
2. Pass the end of the cord through the loop.
3. Bring the end of the cord behind the standing line.
4. Pass the end of the cord through the loop again, forming an “8” shape.
5. Tighten the knot by pulling both ends of the cord.

5. Bowline Knot

The bowline knot is a classic and versatile knot that is known for its strength and security. It creates a fixed loop at the end of a rope that won’t slip or come undone easily. This knot is great for creating a loop for hanging gear, securing shelters, or building traps. Here’s how to tie a bowline knot:

1. Form a small loop with the paracord, leaving a long end.
2. Pass the long end of the cord through the loop from underneath.
3. Bring the long end around the standing line.
4. Pass the long end through the loop again, this time going over the standing line.
5. Tighten the knot by pulling both ends of the cord.

6. Clove Hitch Knot

The clove hitch knot is a useful knot for temporarily attaching a rope or cord to a post, tree, or other structures. It’s quick to tie and untie, making it handy for various camping and survival tasks. Here’s how to tie a clove hitch knot:

1. Wrap the paracord around the object, crossing the working end over the standing line.
2. Bring the working end under and over the standing line.
3. Bring the working end back under itself.
4. Tighten the knot by pulling both ends of the cord.

7. Snake Knot

The snake knot is an intricate knot that creates a decorative pattern resembling the scales of a snake. It’s commonly used to make bracelets, lanyards, or handles, adding both functionality and aesthetics to your paracord projects. Here’s how to tie a snake knot:

1. Fold the paracord in half and create a loop at the folded end.
2. Bring the right end of the cord over the loop and under the left end.
3. Pass the left end of the cord through the loop from behind.
4. Bring the left end over the loop and under the right end.
5. Pass the right end through the loop from behind.
6. Tighten the knot by pulling both ends of the cord.

Conclusion

Tying paracord knots is not only a practical skill but also a fun and creative way to enhance your survival knowledge. Whether you’re a survivalist, camper, hiker, or just someone who appreciates the versatility of paracord, practicing these knots will undoubtedly come in handy in various situations. From creating sturdy handles to repairing gear and building shelters, the possibilities are endless.

Remember, practice makes perfect, so take the time to familiarize yourself with these knots. Soon enough, you’ll be able to tie them effortlessly and use them confidently in any survival scenario. So grab your paracord, get knotting, and unleash your creativity!

My 2 Cents

Learning different paracord knots not only adds value to your survival skills but also allows you to tap into your creativity. Consider using different colors or combining multiple knots to create unique and personalized paracord projects. It’s also a great activity to do with friends, family, or fellow survival enthusiasts. Make it a challenge to see who can tie the knots the fastest or create the most impressive designs. Remember, learning and mastering these knots takes time and practice, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a few tries to get them right. Enjoy the process and have fun exploring the endless possibilities that paracord knots offer!